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Manuel Domingo

MD1
“Lincoln Cathedral”
Acrylic on Canvas 50 x 40 cm £1000 (£1100 framed)

MD2
Ref MD1 – “Reflection 58” by manuel domingo Acrylic on Canvas 40 x 50 cm framed £1000 (£1100 framed)
Urban environment – technique is all important to this artist. Atmospheric, textured surface paint, organised choas. Creating order with line, texture and technique.

Ref MD15 – “Lincoln Cathedral” by manuel domingo Acrylic on Canvas 50 x 40 cm £1000 (£1100 framed)
Corner of Bailgate and Westgate (facing towards the Lincoln Cathedral).

MD3REF MD2 – “Reflection 34” Acrylic on Canvas 40 x 50 cm framed £1000 (£1100 framed)
Urban environment – technique is all important to this artist. Atmospheric, textured surface paint, organised choas. Creating order with line, texture and technique.

“Lincoln Cathedral” Acrylic on Canvas 50 x 40 cm £1000 (£1100 framed)


ManuelManuel Domingo Castellanos Profile

My painting career started in the eighties when I witnessed what was happening in Spanish politics and the illusion created at that time – we all felt passionate about expressing ourselves, especially students witnessing the situation.

The cartoonists had a field day, elevating their reputation in Spanish society. In my case, I lived with the person who is known now as one of the most important cartoonist in Spain. It contributed to me wanting to be a painter, an interpreter of the visual language, using marks, lines and the flat application of colour.

I left the photo-realism’s painting while studying one of the last courses in the Faculty of Fine Arts. I plunged between obscure, yet brilliant colours. Curiously, this period lasted approximately a decade.

The progression was more experimental with textures.  After a trip to Turkey, I felt liberated, freeing myself up to a new style at which I felt I was naturally adept.
For me, the nineties brought abundances of golden and silver matter to my work.  The images in the early 1980s had become more serious over the years. In the nineties, this took a more positive form, almost photographic in quality. For this reason I started becoming seriously interested in photography again.

I became seduced by photographic finish, born again; a zeal for deciphering the relations between photography and painting, which became more crystallized in the doctoral thesis that I prepared during the first part of the nineties: “The modernization of the sketch. Jardiel, Delacámara and Oscar G Benedí”.

For a decade I was entranced by it, completely satisfied; so much for the period of investigation and its final result.
I did have concerns about my painting when I finished my doctoral thesis, so I decided to reject the photography and start drawing again, managing to achieve more abstract paintings where the image used to hide behind the texture.
I experimented, recovering previous graphical elements that increased the textures. I smeared the paint to a thickness where I could hardly recognise my work. Probably it was a reaction to me being confused about the type of work appearing in the world of the art. I asked myself, “Where does art and paintings being; has it relegated me to a puppet with know real validation anymore”.

At the turn of the millenium I returned once again to photography, utilising some images very close to what I understand today to be realism but, with my own technique for colour, line and texture, it was removed from the traditional representation. In this decade I started to experiment with different variations of form, between matter, texture, colour and line and this has resulted in a very unique style and I have developed a reputation for this unusual technique.  At present, the texture wants to stand out less – more mature, yet still rugged in volume – forming and adapting to a structure that is clearer and more harmonious.